Oxford brogues

It’s worth clarifying what exactly Oxford Brogues are as opposed to other types of formal lace up shoes. The word Oxford simply refers to the way in which the various sections of the upper leather are stitched together. Essentially there are just two options for the shoemaker but on the whole more shoe styles are made with the Oxford version than any alternative.
With an Oxford brogue all the leather meets at a stitched point at the bottom of the laces. With the alternative option the upper opens up much more fully and the panels of leather with the lace eyelets can flap open. This latter construction technique is known as a gibson or derby shoe.
The advantage of a derby shoe is that it caters much better for a foot with a higher instep since it offers more versatility. An Oxford style tends to look better when used on a brogue or toecap style of shoe.
The term brogue refers to circular holes and other decorative punched gaps made in the upper leather. These tend to be most concentrated around the forepart. There can be various degrees of broguing. A simple punch cap has holes punched along the seam where the toecap meets the forepart. A half brogue has holes punched into the toecap and possibly also along some of the other seams. A full brogue has holes punched over most of the forepart and these will also sweep down the sides of the shoe. All these styles may be termed Oxford brogues so long as the various panels are stitched together at a point directly below the lace eyelets.